Search Results for: state of our watersheds

Being Frank: Help Save Turtle Island

The defeat of Initiative 933 and other results of the recent election instilled some new hope in me. Hope that there might be some public inclination, after all, to turn the tide of apathy. Hope that more of us might finally realize the most important things we can pass along to their children are pure water, clean air and abundant fish and wildlife.

Now I know that much hope is a bit of pie in the sky. I don’t expect a raging fire of public discontent to suddenly flare up and demand that actions be taken to save the planet from degradation and pollution. I don’t expect to suddenly see all the dams removed, solar panels sprout on every house, and urban sprawl to stop dead in its tracks. But maybe, just maybe, the election results will fan an ember—a spark of understanding that could generate momentum toward our goal to sustain Turtle Island in a way our descendants will be able to continue.

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Federal Update for November 2006

Download Word Document APPROPRIATIONS The mid-term election could have some eventual impacts on the appropriations process, as members of Congress prepare to journey to the nation’s capitol for a brief lame duck congress on November 13. Appropriations will be the most critical issue at hand. The continuing resolution, sent to the White House attached to the FY 2007 defense appropriations bill (HR 5631) has been relied upon to fund all appropriations bills not enacted by October 1. The House Interior-Environment Appropriations Bill (HR 5386), which provides the majority of funding to Northwest tribal natural resource programs (principally through BIA Fish and Wildlife Program/Rights Protection category) made it to the Senate Calendar on June 29, where it stalled. Challenges will continue no matter which party controls the House and/or Senate in 2007, but the election results are unlikely to solve the appropriations puzzle that will confront members of the 109th Congress during a post-election session. Challenges resulting from a $300 billion federal deficit will continue to plague Congress. In fact, neither side is yet talking about how the remaining FY 2007 spending bills will be completed. Some congressional representatives have said there is no realistic chance the Republican-controlled 109th will be able to pass all the remaining appropriations bills individually during the lame-duck session. Democrats have not settled on a plan for handling appropriations if they do win control. When...

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Puget Sound Partnership launched

Yesterday Billy Frank Jr. joined Gov. Christine Gregoire and other dignitaries to announce the Puget Sound Partnership. The Tacoma News Tribune: Billy Frank Jr., a Nisqually Indian who is chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, is among Gregoire’s Puget Sound Partnership appointees. In echoing Gregoire’s call for attention to the Sound’s needs, he compared it to the nest of a pair of eagles that live near his home. “This Puget Sound is our nest, all of our nests, and it’s asking for help right now,” Frank said. King County Journal: “It isn’t a case of can we do it. We have to do it,” said Frank, a Nisqually elder and longtime advocate for tribal-fishing rights. Franks called on everyone to work together to ensure the sound is a resource for generations to come. “It’s asking for our help,” he said. “Take care of it. It’s our home. It’s our backyard.” Seattle PI: “The cleanup initiative is so important to all of us,” said Frank, of the Fisheries Commission. “It isn’t a case of can we do it; we have to do it. “This Puget Sound is our nest — all of our nests. And it’s asking for help.” Part of the new effort is focussed on restoring estuaries throughout Puget Sound. From the Olympian: $3.25 million to restore estuaries and salmon habitat, keying on projects where there are...

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Nooksack Biologist Receives Prestigious Environmental Award

Ned Currence, a biologist with the Nooksack Tribe’s natural resources department, has been recognized for his environmental work with the Tri-State Water Council’s prestigious Scott Hall Award. “Ned is a passionate and effective advocate for fisheries and water resources, as well as for treaty rights to those resources,” said Bob Kelly, director of Nooksack Natural Resources. “He is a strong inspiration to those who work with him, and we’re very proud that he has received this award.” Ned Currence, a biologist with the Nooksack Tribe’s natural resources department, has been recognized for his environmental work with the Tri-State Water Council’s prestigious Scott Hall Award. “Ned is a passionate and effective advocate for fisheries and water resources, as well as for treaty rights to those resources,” said Bob Kelly, director of Nooksack Natural Resources. “He is a strong inspiration to those who work with him, and we’re very proud that he has received this award.” Established to recognize an individual with exceptional integrity in environmental protection, the award is named in honor of Scott Hall, who served on the council from 1993 through 1999 as a representative of the Kalispel Tribe. The award is designed to honor a person who demonstrates exceptional dedication and integrity in his or her field and sets aside personal agendas to build partnerships that lead to successful environmental outcomes. Its recipient is recognized for “bridging...

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Tulalip Tribes Celebrate A Century of Cooperative Management

Around the turn of the last century, Tulalip paddlers delivered salmon to a state-run hatchery. Today, their descendents are helping deliver plentiful fish runs back to the waterways of Snohomish County.

One hundred years ago, when Tulalip Indians canoed the Snohomish River toward a fish hatchery operated by the State of Washington, they carried wild salmon for a nascent supplementation program. They also brought with them the origins of today�s forward-thinking resource management in the basin.

This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the Tulalip Tribes� cooperative salmon enhancement program with the state.

�It’s a significant milestone,� said the Tulalip Tribes� Fisheries and Wildlife Director Danny Simpson. �It shows that we have always been concerned with the future of fish runs, and been willing to work together to protect them.�

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    • Northwest Treaty Tribes is a service of
      Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
    • Northwest Treaty Tribes Magazine for Summer 2017 Available Now
    • Billy Frank Jr Memorial Edition of the NWIFC Magazine Available Here
    • Treaty Rights at Risk

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