Search Results for: state of our watersheds

State of Our Watersheds: Makah Tribe brings back large wood for salmon

It is well established that logs and logjams provide vital habitat for salmon. More salmon leave watersheds where there is enough large woody debris for salmon. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case in many streams in the Makah Tribe’s area of interest. To reverse this trend, the tribe has been working to return wood to vital salmon streams, according to the most recent State of Our Watersheds Report, released by Northwest Treaty Tribes. From the report: The legacy and impacts of historic logging practices that harvested riparian zones is still felt as there is a reduced quantity and quality of large woody...

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State of Our Watersheds: Six of 12 pocket estuary projects done in Whidbey basin

Six of 12 pocket estuary projects prioritized in the Skagit Chinook Recovery Plan have been completed since 2005. The 12 pocket estuaries total 76.8 acres of usable habitat area within a day’s swimming distance for Skagit River juvenile chinook. The restored pocket estuaries are estimated to increase chinook smolt production by over 48,000 smolts. These findings were included in the treaty tribes’ 2016 State of Our Watershed Report. Since the 2012 report, projects in Turners Bay and Dugualla Heights were completed. Researchers found that more than two-thirds of historic pocket estuaries in the Whidbey basin were completely lost to...

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State of Our Watersheds: Shoreline Modifications Detrimental to Salmon Habitat

Of all the Puget Sound counties, between 2005 and 2014, Mason County had the largest amount of armored shoreline developed on its waterfront properties. More than 200 hydraulic project approvals were issued during that time period, resulting in 1.6 miles of armored shoreline, while only 714 feet of armoring were removed. Armored shoreline is an issue for nearshore habitat, which provides a space for salmonids to rear and forage, and is continually being impacted, according to the most recent State of Our Watersheds Report, released by Northwest Treaty Tribes. Bulkheads, fill, roads, highways, docks and piers are all examples of shoreline development...

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State of Our Watersheds: Shoreline armoring outpaces restoration

One and a half miles of shoreline was armored while only a third of a mile was restored near the mouth of the Nisqually River between 2005 and 2014. This negative salmon habitat trend is a finding in the State of Our Watersheds Report, recently released by the treaty tribes in western Washington. From the report: From 2005-2014, 329 Hydraulic Project Approvals (HPAs) were issued in Pierce and Thurston counties resulting in an additional 1.5 miles of armored shoreline and the removal of 0.3 miles of armoring, resulting in a net increase of 1.2 miles. … Construction of bulkheads...

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State of Our Watersheds: Hundreds of new wells hurting Chehalis River salmon

Despite already closed to new water extractions, the proliferation of new wells in the upper Chehalis River is continuing to worsen conditions for salmon in the Chehalis River. This is a finding in the State of Our Watersheds Report, recently released by the treaty tribes in western Washington. Conditions on several tributaries to the upper Chehalis are bad for salmon in the summer. So much so that the state has closed them for further appropriation. From the report: Many streams in the Chehalis basin, including Scatter Creek, as well as Black, Skookumchuck and Newaukum rivers, are closed to further...

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    • Northwest Treaty Tribes is a service of
      Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
    • Northwest Treaty Tribes Magazine for Summer 2017 Available Now
    • Billy Frank Jr Memorial Edition of the NWIFC Magazine Available Here
    • Treaty Rights at Risk

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