Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe elder Adeline Smith died March 19, 2013. She was 95. She was known for helping preserve the Tse-whit-zen village site and the Klallam Language, and played a part in the removal of the Elwha River dams.

From the Peninsula Daily News:

PORT ANGELES — Adeline Smith, the Lower Elwha Klallam tribal elder who played key roles in preserving the site of Tse-whit-zen village, the Elwha River dam removals and documenting the Klallam language, has died.

Smith, who turned 95 last Friday, died Tuesday morning in Tacoma, where she was staying with family members, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribal Chairwoman Frances Charles said Tuesday afternoon.

Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe elder Adeline Smith, at the September 2011 Elwha River Dam Removal ceremony. She passed away March 13, 2013.

Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe elder Adeline Smith, at the September 2011 Elwha River Dam Removal ceremony. She passed away March 13, 2013.

Smith celebrated her 95th birthday with family members and other members of the tribe, Charles said.

No memorial service date has been announced.

Born March 15, 1918, Smith grew up in the Port Angeles area, watching the decline in salmon runs on the Elwha River and the disappearance of Tse-whit-zen village on the Port Angeles Harbor waterfront.

In the early 21st century, she witnessed the preservation of the Tse-whit-sen site after a state dry-dock construction project to build floating-bridge pontoons was halted.

And she celebrated with tribal members at the September 2011 ceremonies to begin the removal of the two Elwha River dams.

Once the reservoir behind the lower Elwha Dam was drained, she witnessed the tribe’s ceremonial creation site that had been inundated since Lake Aldwell was created just before she was born.