Author: lloomis

Being Frank: Bold Action Needed for Salmon Recovery

Being Frank is a monthly column written by the chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chair, the column represents the interests and concerns of treaty Indian tribes throughout western Washington. Frustrated with the lack of progress in salmon recovery – especially Puget Sound chinook – treaty tribes in western Washington have proposed seven bold actions to jump-start those efforts. Puget Sound chinook were listed under the Endangered Species Act in 1999 but continue to hover at about 10 percent of their historical population. We are calling on the Leadership Council of the...

Read More

Being Frank: Atlantic Salmon Must Go

Being Frank is a monthly column written by the chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chair, the column represents the interests and concerns of treaty Indian tribes throughout western Washington. The backlash against Atlantic salmon farms in western Washington continues to grow as more than 100,000 of the non-native fish remain unaccounted for following the collapse of a Cooke Aquaculture facility in northern Puget Sound last month. Treaty tribes in western Washington have adopted a policy rejecting Atlantic salmon aquaculture in our region because we believe the state’s permitting requirements, oversight and...

Read More

Being Frank: No Place Here for Atlantic Salmon

Being Frank is a monthly column written by the chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chair, the column represents the interests and concerns of treaty Indian tribes throughout western Washington. All Atlantic salmon fish farms in Puget Sound should be closed and future expansion plans scrapped following the Aug. 19 escape of thousands of the non-native fish from a facility on Cypress Island in northern Puget Sound. Treaty tribes in western Washington are shouldering most of the cleanup burden after the escape of about 200,000 fish when a section of Cooke Aquaculture’s...

Read More

Being Frank: Sport Crabbing Needs In-season Management

Being Frank is a monthly column written by the chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chair, the column represents the interests and concerns of treaty Indian tribes throughout western Washington. The same principles we use to manage many of our salmon fisheries should be used to regulate recreational harvest of Dungeness crab in Puget Sound. During most chinook salmon fisheries, we develop in-season estimates using catch data gathered from anglers returning to the dock and from fish tickets issued to treaty tribal and non-Indian commercial fishermen when they sell their catch. This...

Read More

Being Frank: Let’s Move Past the Culvert Case

Being Frank is a monthly column written by the chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chair, the column represents the interests and concerns of treaty Indian tribes throughout western Washington. The state of Washington has made remarkable progress in the past four years toward meeting a federal court mandate to repair hundreds of fish-blocking culverts under state roads. Failing culverts deny tribal treaty-reserved fishing rights that include the right for salmon to be available for harvest. Our right to harvest salmon was one of the few things we kept when we gave...

Read More

    • Northwest Treaty Tribes is a service of
      Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
    • Northwest Treaty Tribes Magazine for Fall 2017 Available Now
    • Billy Frank Jr Memorial Edition of the NWIFC Magazine Available Here
    • Treaty Rights at Risk

Receive News by Email